How to Develop Your Brand When You are Still a Startup

In Branding, Enterprise, Small Business by tmc0 Comments

As a start-up company, you probably are facing lots of challenges, including reaching out to more clients, having to deal with some dissatisfied clients, running things without a hitch, overbearing expenses and overhead costs which just seem to keep piling up as there is always a need for one thing or the other, the need to repair or fix one thing or the other, etc.

In the article below, Fast company senior Editor, Chris Dannen shared 4 tips for developing your brand, most especially as a start-up. This doesn’t mean it doesn’t work for those brands and companies which have stayed for a while. Even owners of such companies will agree that these 4 tips are indeed very important.

  1. BE ACTIVE ON MANY PLATFORMS

While there are so many platforms to choose from, you have to figure out which would work best for you. Is it social media or the traditional means of disseminating information about your brand? Ask yourself which would be better. Your start-up needs to have a presence across multiple social media platforms. Don’t forget that each community attracts people with different interests; your job is to tailor the message and content to the medium.

Dannen thinks about the social media landscape as a network of nodes. You want to produce content that is specific to each channel, but also interlink them so people can bounce between platforms until they find the one that really resonates with them.

  1. HIRE INTERNS TO CAPTURE BEHIND-THE-SCENES STORIES

No one ever wants to hear you talk about something you’re not an expert in. What are you an expert in? Your own story. Don’t give away your secret sauce, but do share struggles and breakthroughs to offer others a peek into your world.

Give interns cameras and have them capture your story on a daily basis. You never know when the magic moments will occur. Later, someone on the marketing or social media team can centralize the content, filter it, shine it up and push it out through your distribution channels. “There’s no better way to get publicity than through curious interns with smartphones and apps,” says Dannen.

In turn, the interns will get to know everyone on staff and learn how your business really works since they are essentially interviewing the whole team. We definitely should try this in Nigeria, just the way Multichoice is doing by showing us on DSTV, the success stories of those who started doing business with them and how these businesses have grown over the years, especially with their support over the years.

  1. PACKAGE CONTENT WITH A “SERVICE” ANGLE

We all are always looking for better ways of doing things, from googling how to make a nice garden egg sauce to how to tie gele in a specific way to how to fix that registry problem you have on our system, etc. Have you noticed that there are usually particular sites you go to when you need help solving an issue or want to learn something from? People are always looking for a better way to process their world, and if you can give them an edge with practical advice or knowledge, they’ll keep coming back for your expertise. Provide value to your readers and they’ll eventually return the favour. 

  1. HONE YOUR TWITTER PRESENCE

Your Twitter presence matters a lot as a LOT of people are on Twitter these days. It is a platform where they get the latest information, follow trends, get gist and gossip. Honing your Twitter presence will go a long way in getting followers and getting word across about your product and/or service.

Test different “headlines” in your tweets, but don’t actually capitalize your words like a headline. Use different phrases as a litmus test to understand what people are interested in reading or sharing. The more capital letters and tagged handles you include in a tweet, the less often people tend to click the link. People want something conversational. Every single person on your team should be blogging and tweeting, from the founder to the engineers.

What do you think? do you agree? Have you tried any of this before? What has been the outcome thus far? What would you like to add as the owner of a company which has weathered the storms and is doing very well now? Do share in the comments section.

 

Culled from Stanfordbusiness.tumblr.com

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